Getting Comfortable With Javascript

Apr 8, 2018 · 437 words · 3 minute read

Part 1: Getting Started

Getting comfortable with HTML and CSS is no easy task. These tasks are underrated in the community and taken for granted.

Be it that you love writing good clean and minimal markup with accessibility concerns addressed or you have a single div and feel like you can conquer the world in your CSS file.

Javascript is a natural next step for anyone who spends time writing HTML and CSS. But, depending on which way you come at JS. It can be so overwhelming.

There is jQuery, React, Angular, Node, Vue and countless other libraries and frameworks that people are talking about and writing tutorials for.

So where do you start? What is the best place to get your feet wet? Do you start with jQuery but you just read that people don’t use jQuery anymore?

In this series, we are going to look at a few key concepts that are going to help you in your JavaScript journey.

When I started to take the leap into javascript, I wanted to know how to do everything ever possible. The wonderful thing about JavaScript is that it is such a wide and giant world that it could be overwhelming to come in without much experience.

But, what worked for me and what we are going to break down is a few common things that happen in a lot of projects and use that as a launching off point. Once, we nail down these concepts. We will be off to the races.

We are going to explain Javascript vs jQuery, what is the console and events.

Vanilla vs Jquery

Jquery is a framework that makes writing JavaScript just a whole lot simpler. It still is incredibly popular and widely used on many websites out there. jQuery makes manipulating your document such a breeze and if you know CSS the syntax is very easy to grasp and to get rolling.

Recent upgrades to JavaScript has made it much easier to learn vanilla JS out of the gate. jQuery used to be the best way to learn JavaScript because the syntax was so much streamlined.

In this series we will use examples of vanilla and jQuery. You might feel more comfortable with one set of syntax over an another. The goal is just to get you to writing some scripts.

With jQuery you will have to load an external file on your site every time you want your code to run. Something like this.

<script src=https://code.jquery.com/jquery-3.2.1.js"></script>

With vanilla js your browser can run that code natively.

Part 2: Coming Soon

We will discuss the console and click events.